Kim’s ‘opt-out’ recommendation was a ‘pheasant and an egg’ for Lee.

“I was obsessed with the minor league veto, but it ended up being meaningless. I’d rather have an ‘opt out’ option.”Kim Ha-seong (28, San Diego Padres) gave this advice to Lee Jung-hoo, who was about to enter Major League Baseball (MLB), at a press conference in Korea last month.He explained that MLB teams don’t really need a veto clause because they can’t easily send high-priced players to the minors.In fact, in his first year in the big leagues, Kim struggled in 2021, batting .202 (54-for-267) in 117 games, but he was never demoted.Kim recommended an “opt-out,” which allows a player to become a free agent early without having to complete his contract if he meets certain conditions.Did he heed his close senior’s advice?According to local media in the U.S., Lee signed a six-year, $113 million contract with the San Francisco Giants that included a “four-year opt-out” clause.

While we’ll have to wait and see the specifics, opt-outs are generally considered to be more favorable to the player than the team.The player is guaranteed a certain amount of income by signing a long-term contract, and if he performs well early on, he can increase his income even further.Even if it’s not actually exercised, its mere existence gives players an edge in negotiations with clubs.Kim’s teammate Manny Machado’s re-signing with San Diego in February is a prime example.After signing a 10-year, $300 million deal in 2019, Machado announced in advance that he would opt out after the 2023 season, and the Padres quickly gave him an 11-year, $350 million extension.Machado, who would have earned $180 million over the remaining six years of his original deal, will get five more years of service time and $170 million in the new deal.The blueprint is for Lee to spend his first two years in the big leagues 슬롯게이밍 adjusting, then hit his stride in his final two years and hit another free agent jackpot.

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